Confirmed Invited Speakers
Olaf ANDERSEN
Institute for Manufacturing and Advanced Materials, Fraunhofer Institute / GERMANY
NURCAN BAC
Yeditepe University / TURKEY
Omar K. FARHA
Northwestern University / USA
Jeff KENVIN
Leader of the Technical Staff of Micromeritics Instrument Corporation / USA
Seda KESKIN
Koc University / TURKEY
Adam F. LEE
Aston University / UK
Faik Nüzhet OKTAR
Marmara Univ. / TURKEY
M. Lutfi OVECOGLU
Istanbul Technical Univ. / TURKEY
Al SACCO Jr.
Texas Tech. University / USA
Andreas STEIN
Univ. Of Minnesota / USA
Maryam TABRIZIAN
McGill University / CANADA
Mark THOMAS
New Castle Univ. / UK
Mehmet TURKER
Gazi University / TURKEY
Deniz UNER
Middle East Technical Univ. / TURKEY
Taner YILDIRIM
University of Pennsylvania / USA
Haifei ZHANG
University of Liverpool / UK
Yusuf MENCELOGLU
Sabanci University / TURKEY
Please click to download
PPM 2013 Abstract Book
Please click to download
PPM 2013 Proceedings Book

Alacatı, a village 72 km (45 miles) west of Izmir near the tip of the Çeşme peninsula (map), is one of the up-and-coming vacation getaway havens of Turkish Aegean.

Visitors come for the charming old stone houses on narrow streets lined with sidewalk cafes, restaurants and boutiques. Over 80 small inns and boutique hotels provide hospitality. (My favorite is the Taş Otel.)

Among the most eager visitors are windsurfers, who come for the predictable brisk winds over a safe, wave-less, sandy bay.

A windfarm on a neighboring hilltop testifies to the strength and reliability of the winds.

Alacatı (AH-lah-chah-tuh) was founded around 1850, when Ottoman Greek workers from the Aegean islands were brought to the mainland to drain malaria-breeding marshes.

The Greek workers and their families liked what they found (when the malaria was gone), and stayed. They named their village Agrilia. Soon their vineyards were producing wine for export.

The League of Nations-mandated exchange of populations following WWI changed the face of Agrilia, bringing Turkish Muslims from the Balkan countries to the village.

For years, Agrilia/Alacatı slept, as a small farming village forgotten by time. This was lucky, since the village kept much of its character, allowing it to be preserved and beautified.